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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ILLUSTRATIONS

CHAPTER I:
A JOURNEY OF SENTIMENT


CHAPTER II:
THE FATAL ERROR


CHAPTER III:
DUTY FIRST


CHAPTER IV:
A MAN'S GAME


CHAPTER V:
A PERMANENT MEMORIAL


CHAPTER VI:
WILL THE ICE TURN US BACK?


CHAPTER VII:
STORMY VOYAGE


CHAPTER VIII:
RETURN TO NORTHWEST RIVER


CHAPTER IX:
A CHIEF VOYAGEUR


CHAPTER X:
THE BEAVER IS A BAD RIVER


CHAPTER XI:
SOUNDING THE BIG LAKE


CHAPTER XII:
BREAD WITHOUT BAKING POWDER MAKES ME SICK


CHAPTER XIII:
I NEVER TRAVELS ON SUNDAY


CHAPTER XIV:
VIRGIN AS GOD MADE IT


CHAPTER XV:
FIRST PORTAGE


CHAPTER XVI:
TRAIL COMPANIONS


CHAPTER XVII:
MURDOCK'S RAPID


CHAPTER XVIII:
TRACKING THROUGH BOULDERS


CHAPTER XIX:
MARCH TO YOUR FRONT LIKE A SOLDIER


CHAPTER XX:
IT'S ALWAYS BAD LUCK TO TRAVEL ON SUNDAY


CHAPTER XXI:
WORST COUNTRY FOR GAME I EVER SAW


CHAPTER XXII:
BACK TO GET THE BAKING POWDER


CHAPTER XXIII:
DISASTER IN THE RAPIDS


CHAPTER XXIV:
TAKING STOCK


CHAPTER XXV:
GRAPPLING


CHAPTER XXVI:
INDIANS HAVE PLENTY OF HARD TIMES


CHAPTER XXVII:
THIS RIVER IS LIKE A BAD WOMAN


CHAPTER XXVIII:
NO RELIEF FROM WADING


CHAPTER XXIX:
HELL AND TWENTY


CHAPTER XXX:
BACKPACKING TO THE SUSAN


CHAPTER XXXI:
VALLEY OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH


CHAPTER XXXII:
THE MIND WORKS CURIOUSLY


CHAPTER XXXIII:
RELIVING THE PARTING


CHAPTER XXXIV:
MARKING HUBBARD'S BOULDER


CHAPTER XXXV:
A NEW DISASTER


CHAPTER XXXVI:
THE HARDEST BIT OF TRAVELING I EVER DONE


CHAPTER XXXVII:
SOMETHING WORTHWHILE UP THERE IN THE HILLS


NOTES

PHOTO GALLERY

COLOUR SLIDE GALLERY

ADDENDUM TO
THIRD EDITION

COMMENTS ON THE
NAMING COMPULSION


BACK TO THE LABRADOR WILDS

 XXV

GRAPPLING

The next morning, utilizing some 8-o treble hooks, we improvised a grapple with which to drag the river for the tablet.  The hooks were too light for the purpose, but we had no better material at hand.  The tablet, when lost, was wrapped, and well bound with ropes.  We were well aware that even should we thus succeed in locating the tablet, our frail device would not be sufficiently strong to bring it to the surface; but we believed that, with the location of the tablet once established, some method might be found for its rescue.

With our grappling arrangement well weighted, we began a systematic dragging of the river, beginning at a point where the accident happened, and continuing for a considerable distance down stream.  It soon became evident, however, that our efforts in this direction must prove futile.  In spite of weights, we were unable, in the swifter water, to force the hooks to the bottom, and nothing less would answer.  Two hours were spent in vain endeavor, however, before we finally acknowledged ourselves defeated.

Disappointed in this direction, we made a survey of the river, with the hope that we might now carry into execution Judge Malone’s plan for deviating the current, but we were quickly convinced that any attempt in this direction would consume more time than we had at our disposal.  Boulders heavy enough to hold their position against the force of water were too heavy to move save by tedious and slow effort; and we had neither sufficient rope, nor rope that was strong enough, to be used in the construction of a derrick.

Defeated in these efforts for the rescue of the tablet, we returned to camp to hold council, and consider other possible methods and plans; but no practical method by which the tablet might be recovered presented itself, and our discussion ended with the decision that we must accept as gracefully as possible our loss.  We still had the cold chisels, drills and hammer, which were to have been used in setting the tablet, and I suggested that with these we proceed to the scene of Hubbard’s last camp and cut an inscription into the face of the rock upon which we had hoped to place the tablet.  This it was finally decided to do.  Judge Malone, always looking upon the brighter side of things, and making the best of circumstances, expressed the opinion:

“After all, an inscription cut upon the rock will be a more appropriate memorial, I believe, than the bronze tablet would have been.”

 

Next: Chapter XXVI: Indians Have Plenty Of Hard Times