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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ILLUSTRATIONS

CHAPTER I:
A JOURNEY OF SENTIMENT


CHAPTER II:
THE FATAL ERROR


CHAPTER III:
DUTY FIRST


CHAPTER IV:
A MAN'S GAME


CHAPTER V:
A PERMANENT MEMORIAL


CHAPTER VI:
WILL THE ICE TURN US BACK?


CHAPTER VII:
STORMY VOYAGE


CHAPTER VIII:
RETURN TO NORTHWEST RIVER


CHAPTER IX:
A CHIEF VOYAGEUR


CHAPTER X:
THE BEAVER IS A BAD RIVER


CHAPTER XI:
SOUNDING THE BIG LAKE


CHAPTER XII:
BREAD WITHOUT BAKING POWDER MAKES ME SICK


CHAPTER XIII:
I NEVER TRAVELS ON SUNDAY


CHAPTER XIV:
VIRGIN AS GOD MADE IT


CHAPTER XV:
FIRST PORTAGE


CHAPTER XVI:
TRAIL COMPANIONS


CHAPTER XVII:
MURDOCK'S RAPID


CHAPTER XVIII:
TRACKING THROUGH BOULDERS


CHAPTER XIX:
MARCH TO YOUR FRONT LIKE A SOLDIER


CHAPTER XX:
IT'S ALWAYS BAD LUCK TO TRAVEL ON SUNDAY


CHAPTER XXI:
WORST COUNTRY FOR GAME I EVER SAW


CHAPTER XXII:
BACK TO GET THE BAKING POWDER


CHAPTER XXIII:
DISASTER IN THE RAPIDS


CHAPTER XXIV:
TAKING STOCK


CHAPTER XXV:
GRAPPLING


CHAPTER XXVI:
INDIANS HAVE PLENTY OF HARD TIMES


CHAPTER XXVII:
THIS RIVER IS LIKE A BAD WOMAN


CHAPTER XXVIII:
NO RELIEF FROM WADING


CHAPTER XXIX:
HELL AND TWENTY


CHAPTER XXX:
BACKPACKING TO THE SUSAN


CHAPTER XXXI:
VALLEY OF THE SHADOW OF DEATH


CHAPTER XXXII:
THE MIND WORKS CURIOUSLY


CHAPTER XXXIII:
RELIVING THE PARTING


CHAPTER XXXIV:
MARKING HUBBARD'S BOULDER


CHAPTER XXXV:
A NEW DISASTER


CHAPTER XXXVI:
THE HARDEST BIT OF TRAVELING I EVER DONE


CHAPTER XXXVII:
SOMETHING WORTHWHILE UP THERE IN THE HILLS


NOTES

PHOTO GALLERY

COLOUR SLIDE GALLERY

ADDENDUM TO
THIRD EDITION

COMMENTS ON THE
NAMING COMPULSION

Back To The Labrador Wilds

III

Hubbard's Last Camp

 Expanded Third Edition 2016


NOTES

Chapter V The rediscovery of Hubbard’s camp in 1973 created a renewed interest in the bronze plaque lost in the Beaver River, including the question of its weight. This detail is nowhere to be found in Wallace’s accounts of the 1913 journey. The New York Times reported on 23 October 1913 that friends of Wallace had expressed concern at not hearing from him since early September, when he set out alone up the Labrador coast. The report went on to say that Judge Malone and Gilbert Blake, who returned to civilization two months previously, had described the lost tablet as weighing sixty pounds.

Chapter XII "Breat" is not a typographical error. Wallace's spelling for bread is the way the Labrador trappers pronounced it.  In his youth, Rudy Mauro often heard the pronunciation when trappers purchased their staples at the local Hudson's Bay Company store.

Chapter XXI Charles Riley, an enthusiastic sportsman who had shown much interest in the expedition, was an official of the Horton Manufacturing Company, of Bristol, Connecticut.

Chapter XXX O’Keefe Lake was named by Wallace for Dan O’Keefe, under whom Hubbard had served as a cub reporter on the old New York Daily News. In 1913, he was Managing Editor of the New York Commercial. It was O’Keefe who got together with some of Hubbard’s friends and donated the bronze plaque for mounting in Labrador.

Chapter XXXII In 1973, to mark the occasion of the rediscovery of Hubbard’s last camp by Rudy Mauro and Dillon Wallace III, the Canadian Committee for Geographical Names recognized Goose Creek, Mountaineer Lake, Elson Lake, Murdock’s Rapid and the Charles Riley River as official names on the map.

The 2,500-foot mountains attained by the Hubbard expedition and given the name Kipling Mountains by Wallace in 1903 in honour of Hubbard, were later unknowingly designated the Red Wine Mountains by the Canadian Geological Survey. In 1973, in recognition of the oversight, the Committee for Geographical Names applied the name Mount Kipling to the mass immediately east of Disappointment Lake, which rises 673 feet above the water.

 

 

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